Monthly Archives: August 2016

Cabin Air Filters For Your Car

Fittingly, therefore, each year AAFA asks the President of the United States to officially declare May as National Asthma and Allergy Awareness Month. And, the first Tuesday of May is World Asthma Day. This year it is May 6th.

While most people who suffer from asthma and allergies know they can use air filters to control the allergens in their homes, few are aware that there is a similar device for their vehicle. Called a “cabin air filter,” this device is especially designed by automakers to ensure that the air one breathes inside a vehicle is clean and free from environmental pollutants when the windows are rolled up.

More than 100 million vehicles on the road in the U.S. today are equipped with cabin air filters. The owner’s manual will tell you if your car is equipped with one or not. Typically, the cabin air filter is located behind the glove box, under the hood near the windshield or under the dash.

“Normally, while driving – especially if one happens to suffer from asthma or allergies – the tendency is to roll up the windows to prevent breathing in dirty outside air,” said Kevin O’Dowd, Director of Marketing & Communications for MANN+HUMMEL Purolator Filters, supplier of a variety of automotive filters to the North American aftermarket. “However, if the car’s cabin air filter is clogged, the occupants inside could be breathing in six times the contaminants than they would had the windows been down.” O’Dowd said.

A clean cabin air filter keeps the air inside the car clean and protects the driver and passengers against the “bad stuff.” This could include both – the invasion of pollutants from the air outside as well as “blowing” the dirt residing within the clogged air filter back into the interior of the vehicle.

Purolator offers BreatheEASY® cabin air filters in two styles depending on the part number, said O’Dowd. One is a particulate filter, and the other is an upgrade to an activated charcoal filter that has the ability to filter out noxious gases and unpleasant odors. A used cabin air filter can be replaced with either type, regardless of which was installed by the vehicle’s manufacturer.

Replacement is generally simple for a do-it yourselfer (DIYer) or professional technician and many Purolator BreatheEASY cabin air filters come with detailed vehicle-specific installation instructions. Most can be installed in approximately 15 minutes.

Change Your Cars Engine

Thinking along the same lines, what would you say then are the odds of damaging your engine if your engine air filter fails?

Consider this: Your engine ingests about 10,000 gallons of air for every gallon of fuel it consumes. If your gas tank holds 18 gallons of fuel, your engine will ingest 180,000 gallons of air for every tank full of gas it uses. Say you’ve decided to take a road trip to your vacation destination 500 miles away – a 1,000-mile round trip.  If your car consumes 50 gallons of fuel at 20 miles per gallon, it means your engine will handle about 500,000 gallons of air on this trip alone.  What, then, would the odds be of damaging your engine if your engine air filter fails? Much higher than you realize, one should think.

When it comes to changing your car’s engine air filter, stacking the odds in your favor and minimizing the ones that are against you is definitely the safer and cheaper alternative. Change your car’s engine air filter at least once a year.

According to Kevin O’Dowd, Director of Marketing & Communications at MANN+HUMMEL Purolator Filters, manufacturer and supplier of top quality filters to the North American aftermarket,“If you are planning to keep your car for a long time, as many motorists are in this tight economy, and want to ensure that it provides the best performance it is capable of, it’s not enough to only change the oil and filter regularly. It’s equally important to change the engine air filter at least once a year – more frequently if you live or drive in more dirty and dusty conditions. ”

Explaining the logic behind his advice, O’Dowd said, “The easiest route for particulates to enter a vehicle’s engine is through the air induction system and, therefore, through your engine’s air filter. Abrasive dust, dirt and other pollutants that enter through the air intake ducts while you are driving can damage a car’s internal engine components, increase wear and tear and ultimately compromise the engine’s power, performance and life. ”

This is more likely if a car’s engine air filter has not been changed in a while or perhaps is torn or split due to neglect. It will let dirt enter the engine and make its way past pistons and piston rings and into the oil supply potentially destroying key internal components. More important, once the damage sets in, there is no turning back. The dirt that has entered the engine may well have damaged the valves and valve seats, the piston rings and cylinder walls, and the engine bearings. This may ultimately require replacing your entire engine at a cost of $4,000 or more, plus all the aggravation that accompanies such an experience.

“To select a good quality engine air filter,” said O’Dowd, “requires knowing its ‘capacity’ and ‘efficiency’ in capturing the dirt before it enters the engine combustion chamber.  These are the two most important criteria that determine the protection it will offer. Capacity is the amount of dirt the filter can hold before it begins to restrict air flow and efficiency describes how well it performs its job,” he said.

Modern engines are built to be more fuel-efficient and have smaller orifices and tighter tolerances and call for engine air filters that can trap even the smallest particle of dirt that can enter the system.

Purolator’s PureONE air filter’s oil-wetted, high-capacity media, for instance, offers twice the capacity of conventional filters to trap contaminants smaller than the size of a grain of sand and is 99.5 percent efficient. This means it traps 99.5 percent of particles that size or larger. Likewise, Purolator Classic air filter’s multi-fiber, high-density media traps 96.5 percent of contaminants.

So you can be 99.5 percent confident that a new PureONE engine air filter will keep harmful contaminants out of your engine and 100 percent confident that a torn air filter will allow damaging debris to enter your engine. The only unknowns will be how quickly and badly your engine will be damaged.

“The good news is, changing your car’s air filter is almost always quick, easy and inexpensive,” O’Dowd said. Modern, more advanced fuel-injected engines normally use a flat, rectangular panel-type air filter that is located in black plastic duct work in the engine compartment. “Usually, all you need is to release several clamps, separate the housing halves, lift out the old filter, and install the new one. It’s that simple,” O”Dowd said.

Select a name-brand filter whose quality and design features are reliable and well documented, he said. “Experience and documented innovation are key considerations with a product like an engine air filter that can have a major influence on the life of a $4,000 automobile engine. If you need surgery, you will certainly want an experienced surgeon who has performed many operations and who has a track record of successful outcomes,” he said.

Change the batteries in your smoke detector

Abrasive dust, dirt and other contaminants that can enter through the engine’s air intake ducts while you are driving can damage a car’s internal engine components, increase wear and ultimately reduce the engine’s power, performance and long life. A vehicle ingests about 10,000 gallons of air to burn a single gallon of fuel and, air along roads and highways contains all kinds of contaminants such as soot, dirt, leaves, straw, tiny bits of rubber, etc. Large quantities of unfiltered air entering the engine compartment can damage critical engine components and cause cylinder wear. Choosing a quality air filter “Capacity and efficiency in capturing the dirt before it enters the engine combustion chamber are key to determining the quality of an air filter,” says O’Dowd. “Capacity is the amount of dirt the filter can hold before it begins to restrict air flow and efficiency describes how well it performs in capturing the dirt.” Modern engines that are built to be more fuel-efficient and have smaller openings and tighter tolerances call for engine air filters that can trap even the smallest particle of dirt threatening to enter the system.

For instance, Purolator’s PureONE air filter’s oil-wetted, high-capacity media offers twice the capacity of conventional filters to trap contaminants smaller than the size of a grain of sand and is 99.5 percent efficient over a range of 1-200 microns using A4 coarse test dust. This means it traps 99.5 percent of particles that size or larger. Likewise, Purolator’s Classic air filter multi-fiber, high-density media traps 96.5 percent of contaminants. Most people should change their vehicle’s engine air filter once a year or every 12,000 miles unless they’re driving in unusually dirty or dusty conditions, suggests O’Dowd. Because of the long intervals between changes it’s important to install the best filter possible for reliable and efficient filtering. Drive to save So, what kind of adjustments will you need to make in how you drive to take full advantage of that improvement? ·

Avoid making “jackrabbit” starts and stops. You need apply a lot less pressure on the gas pedal or the brakes if you give yourself enough time to get to your destination. · Drive gently and smoothly for a more comfortable ride. Aggressive and fast driving will waste gas and lower gas mileage by 33 percent on the highway and by 5 percent around town, according to the EPA. · Stay within speed limits. Gas mileage decreases rapidly at speeds above 60 mph. Each additional 5 mph increases fuel usage by about 7-8 percent (calculation based on EPA figures – see Web site mentioned above). In the final analysis It’s always best to opt for a name-brand filter whose quality and design features are reliable and well documented, says O’Dowd. “Experience and documented innovation are key considerations with a product like an engine air filter that can have a major influence on the life of a $4,000 automobile engine. Think about it, if you need surgery, you will certainly want an experienced surgeon who has performed many operations and who has a track record of successful outcomes.”

According to O’Dowd, “that’s where branding plays an important part, especially with products like filters where motorists – even technicians – don’t have direct access to lab test results to properly assess the performance, durability, and value of a filter.” And O’Dowd should know, since Purolator invented the very first automotive oil filter in 1923 and the first spin-on oil filter in 1955. You want a company that pioneered filtration, has been in the business for nearly a century and has both a track record and a reputation to sustain. You want a company that offers a brand with knowledge, experience, and reliability. So, once you’ve made sure that your car is breathing in fresh, clean air with a quality air filter, adjust your driving style to reap the benefits of better performance and smoother driving. Change your car’s air filter; change your driving style.

Breathing clean air contributes to a long and healthy life

In short, if dirt gets inside an engine it can adversely affect a vehicle’s overall performance and long life. “The air filtration system in an automobile works much like the respiratory system in our bodies,” said Kevin O’Dowd, Director of Marketing & Communications for MANN+HUMMEL Purolator Filters, a leading supplier of automotive filters to the aftermarket in North America. A vehicle ingests as much as 10,000 gallons of air to burn a single gallon of fuel and, air along roads and highways contains all manner of contaminants such as soot, dirt, leaves, straw, tiny bits of rubber, etc. Large quantities of unfiltered air entering the engine compartment can damage critical engine components and cause cylinder wear, said O’Dowd. So what really makes a quality air filter? “’Capacity’ and ‘efficiency’ in capturing the dirt before it enters the engine combustion chamber are two of the most important criteria that determine the quality of an air filter,” said O’Dowd. “Capacity is the amount of dirt the filter can hold before it begins to restrict air flow and efficiency describes how well it performs its job.” Mo

dern engines that are built to be more fuel-efficient and have smaller orifices and tighter tolerances call for engine air filters that can trap even the smallest particle of dirt threatening to enter the system. For instance, Purolator’s PureONE air filter’s oil-wetted, high-capacity media offers twice the capacity of conventional filters to trap contaminants smaller than the size of a grain of sand and is 99.5 percent efficient over a range of 1-200 microns using A4 coarse test dust. This means it traps 99.5 percent of particles that size or larger. Likewise, Purolator Classic air filter’s multi-fiber, high-density media traps 96.5 percent of contaminants. Why design and construction of an air filter are important The design and construction of an air filter also determines how well it supplies an engine’s need for clean air. Today’s more sophisticated fuel-injected engines normally use a flat, rectangular panel-type air filter featuring a specially formulated paper or cellulose media that removes particulates while maintaining minimum resistance to air flow. Air filters that claim to remove really small particles may have too much resistance to air flow. Other suppliers may claim to sell filters with very little resistance to air flow but actually achieve that by opening up the pores and allowing bigger particles to enter the engine.

Either alternative may harm your car’s engine. The goal, therefore, is to use a filter that strikes the best balance between capturing contaminants and not restricting air flow. Furthermore, the media in a panel-type filter is attached to a binding so it can hold its shape. If the adhesive used to attach the media to the binding framework is of inferior quality, it may melt or soften due to high under-hood temperatures. This may cause the media to pull away leaving a gap and allowing unfiltered air to enter the engine and do damage. Or, if the air filter begins to get clogged, the engine vacuum can suck in the media, once again allowing unfiltered air to bypass and enter the engine compartment. Most people should change their vehicle’s engine air filter once a year or 12,000 miles unless you’re driving in unusually dirty or dusty conditions said O’Dowd. Because of the long intervals between changes it’s important to install the best filter possible for reliable and efficient filtering. “The good news is, changing your car’s air filter is quick, easy and inexpensive,” O’Dowd said. Older cars often had a radial air filter resting in a round housing under a lid held in place by a wing nut. Today’s more advanced fuel-injected engines normally use a flat, rectangular panel-type air filter that resides in black plastic duct work in the engine compartment.

Usually, all you need is to release several clamps, separate the housing halves, lift out the old filter, and install the new one. It’s that simple, O’Dowd said. What it finally boils down to … In the final analysis, it’s always best to opt for a name brand filter whose quality and design features are reliable and well documented, says O’Dowd. “Experience and documented innovation are key considerations with a product like an engine air filter that can have a major influence on the life of a $4,000 automobile engine. Think about it, if you need surgery, you will certainly want an experienced surgeon who has performed many operations and who has a track record of successful outcomes.”